Tuesday, September 29, 2009

WOCK On Vinyl - Aussie Radio Jingles

.
Before things get too serious at Rock On Vinyl, I thought it might be fun to post a song at the end of each month, that could be considered to be either Weird, Obscure, Crazy or just plain Korny.
.
This WOCK posting comes under the 'Obscure' category. Music is a big seller of products and services and is an important part of advertising. In particular, well known bands and artists have been used to reproduce commercial jingles to sell their products, and Aussie bands are no exception. This posting provides a sample of the more classic jingles from such bands as The Easybeats, The Masters Apprentices, The Bee Gees and Hush. Most of these jingles were sourced from a series of CD's called the "Psychedelic Promos & Radio Spots" and contain many other international artists.
One Easybeat's promo for Coca Cola was released in 1966 and was called "Swing the Jingle for Coca Cola". Released on a various artists one-sided EP (EMI Custom, PRS 1610), it included Easybeats Coke Jingle # 1 (Wright-Young). I am unsure of when the second jingle (included here) was released.
In 1968, the Bee Gees wrote and recorded two songs for Coca-cola. It sounds as if Bill Shepherd is doing the orchestrations. I've heard them on tape, but not on any commerical (no pun intended) releases. One jingle is entitled "Another Cold and Windy Day". This tune is reminiscent of "Holiday," and features Robin seeking solace to his miserable and unceasing agony in a bottle of sugared phosphoric acid (otherwise known as Coca-Cola). If Tolstoy were to write soft drink jingles, they would sound like this. "...I turn my face into the sun, the time of winter has begun..."The other clip is "Sitting in the Meadow", which is rather similar to "Sir Geoffrey Saved the World". Robin leads on this upbeat tune, with Barry joining in on the chorus. "Sitting in the meadow, frolic in the grass / Wouldn't you be lazy, everybody asks..." and so on.
Other bands chosen to do Coca Cola jingles have been 'The Who' (things go better with), 'The Moody Blues' (chasing the sun), 'The Troggs' (little miss Mary) and 'The Box Tops' (hey there taxi) to name but a few.
.
The Masters Apprentices jingle for Ford was released in May, 1970. (Ford Cortina promo, W&G Custom). This is a fabulous, hard to find, Australian manufactured one sided 7" 45 r.p.m. record from Masters Appentices / The Groop, titled "CORTINA JINGLE / MANDRAKE WINE". It was only pressed in Australia [CAT #ML10064]. This is a split one-side only record that was a product give-away in 1989. It came housed in a plain white diecut paper bag inside a stiff outer white card sleeve.
.
Hush was a 1970s Australian Glam Rock pop group and became famous during frequent appearances on the ABC show Countdown for teenagers and live concerts, and are best remembered for their hit single "Boney Moroney". In 1974, they recorded a one sided promo single for Colonial Jeans called "Get Flaired" (WP-1). I'm sad to say that I remember hearing this jingle on the radio and probably bought a pair of Colonial Jeans because of it - LOL. (thanks to Ozzie Music Man for this track and label scan).
All Jingles have been ripped at 320kps because you know what they say - Things Sound Better At 320kps !

Track Listing
01 - The Easybeats - Coke Spot #1
02 - The Easybeats - Coke Spot #2
03 - The Bee Gees- Coke Spot #1
04 - The Bee Gees - Coke Spot #1
05 - Hush - Get Flaired
06 - Masters Apprentices - Ford Cortina Spot


.Aussie Radio Jingles Link (17Mb) New Link 05/05/2015
.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Icehouse - Live At The Melbourne Showgrounds (1988) Ex SB

(Australian 1977-1989)
.
Icehouse is an Australian rock band, formed as Flowers in 1977 in Sydney. Initially known in Australia for their pub rock style, they later achieved mainstream success utilising synthpop and attained Top Ten singles chart success in both Europe and the U.S. The mainstay of both Flowers and Icehouse has been Iva Davies (singer-songwriter, record producer, guitar, bass, keyboards, oboe) supplying additional musicians as required. The name Icehouse, which was adopted in 1981, comes from an old, cold flat Davies lived in while still establishing his musical career.
In 1980, Countdown host and pop music guru, Molly Meldrum, offered to be the target for anyone to throw custard pies if the second Flowers single, "We Can Get Together," did not make number one on the singles chart. He added to his offer by agreeing to sit in Melbourne Square for an hour as a custard pie target if the album, Icehouse, did not reach number one. While the single and album were both very successful, neither reached number one nationally, but history does not record whether Molly's dare was ever called.
Davies has been working on a new Icehouse album for nearly 10 years now, tentatively titled Bi-Polar Poems, and the album currently remains unfortunately unfinished. On the live front, Icehouse performed recently as part of the Sound Relief benefit in Melbourne and Davies delivered a performance of “Crazy” that 20-plus years later, was still spot on.
.
The live show included here was part of the "Man of Colours" tour which Icehouse undertook to promote the LP of same title. The tour began in Australia’s Bicentenary year 1988 and extended to the end of July. This seven months probably represents the most successful period Icehouse live has yet experienced, and one in which it delighted some of the largest and most varied audiences of its career. One of the first of these included the Prince and Princess of Wales, when Icehouse performed "Electric Blue" at the New South Wales Royal Bicentennial Concert at the Sydney Entertainment Centre.
Two days earlier, they had been the headline act at the Rockalonga Concert at Yarrawonga Showground, before a somewhat less sedate audience of eight thousand plus. A fortnight later, a vast sea of people packing the Main Arena of Melbourne Showground witnessed a stunning Icehouse performance concluding the first day of the Melbourne Music Show on February 13th. Other bands on the bill included Boom Crash Opera and James Reyne. An Adelaide audience of family groups overfilled Elder Park on 4th March, 1988 to experience the ‘Night of Colours’ Concert featuring Icehouse, as part of the Adelaide Festival of the Arts. A further variety of audiences and venues greeted the Man of Colours Tour on its progress through America in June and early July. Icehouse returned to Australia and wound up the tour in Brisbane before a highly enthusiastic outdoor audience of twenty two thousand lining the river bank at Expo ’88.
The rip for the Melbourne Music Show was taken from CD at 192kps and includes full album artwork. (Source: Mixingdesk.blogspot.com)
.

Track Listing
01 - We Can Get Together
02 - Walls
03 - Hey Little Girl
04 - Mr Big
05 - Electric Blue
06 - Heartbreak Kid
07 - Great Southern Land
08 - No Promises
09 - Cross The Border
10 - Can't Help Myself
11 - Crazy
12 - Man of Colours
13 - Baby You're So Strange
14 - Nothing too Serious
.
Band Members
Iva Davies (Lead vocals, Guitar, Oboe)
Bob Kretschmer (Guitars, Vocals)
Steve Morgan (Bass)
Paul Wheeler (Drums)
Andy Qunta (Keyboards, Vocals)
Simon Lloyd (Keyboards, Sax, Trumpet)
.
Icehouse Link (116Mb)  New Link 07/01/2015
.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Focus - Hamburger Concerto (1974)

(Dutch 1969-1978, 2001-Present)
.
Focus is a band I have always admired. They have a way of delivering calm orchestral yet stunning and sharp pieces of music, as well as simple acoustic songs. Focus is a Dutch rock band, founded by classically trained organist/flautist Thijs van Leer in 1969, and is most famous for the songs "Hocus Pocus" and "Sylvia".
In 1971, the group released 'Moving Waves', which brought the band international acclaim and a hit on both sides of the Atlantic with the radio edit of the rock rondo "Hocus Pocus". This rock classic consists of Akkerman's guitar chord sequence used as a recurring theme, with quirky and energetic interludes that include alto flute riffs, accordion, guitar, and drum solos, whistling, nonsensical (Dutch) vocals, falsetto singing, and yodeling. This album established Thijs van Leer and Akkerman as composers who could appeal to progressive-rock album listeners (a large audience in the early 1970s) and radio single buyers.

However, it is their 1974 album "Hamburger Concerto" which really caught my attention as it is nothing short of being a 'masterpiece'. The selftitled track “Hamburger Concerto”, is a brilliant composition which manages to maintain sounds of both classical instruments and of modern rock instruments as well. "Harem Scarem" picks up the pace a notch and has some really great keyboard and guitar work - my favourite track on the album by the way. They do a terrific job at not drowning out different instruments with their assortments of synthesizers and guitars. It really does sound great, but that's not all this album has. “La Cathedrale de Strasbourg” is a nice change of pace, providing a slow piano drawn piece, featuring some great accompaniment and general good musicianship. “Birth” is an upbeat tune with some great Ian Anderson-esque flute work and nice whining solos. The CD release of the album ends with the bonus track “Early birth”, which carries themes from birth including the flute and guitar and puts them in a great dramatic ending, something only leaving you wanting more. This is a great instrumental album. If you can't listen 5 minutes without lyrics, this is not the album for you, and progressive rock is probably not the genre for you anyhow.
.
The rip here was taken from CD remastered copy at 256kps and includes full album artwork.
.
Track Listing
01. Delitae Musicae
02. Hamrem Scarem
03. La Cathedrale de Strasbourg
04. Birth
05. Hamburger Concerto:
I) Starter
II) Rare
III) Medium I
IV) Medium II
V) Well Done
VI) One For The Road
06. Early Birth (bonus track)
.

Band Members:
Thijs van Lee(Flute/Organ/Piano/Harpsichord/Recorder/Mellotron/Vibes/Accordian/Whistling/Vocals)
Jan Akkerman (Guitar/Lute/Timpani)
Bert Ruiter (Bass/Auto Harp/Triangles/Chinese Finger Cymbals/Swiss Bells)
Colin Allen (Drums/Conga/Tambourine/Castanets/Cabassa/Chinese Gong/Timpani/Flexatone).

Focus Link (81Mb) REPOST
.

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Rose Tattoo - Live at Bondi Lifesaver (1980) - Ex SB

(Australian 1976-1985)
.
Rose Tattoo began as a dark, brooding vision conjured up by Peter Wells, the imposing figure who had played bass with Sydney street punks, Buffalo. What he wanted to create was the loudest, most aggressive rock 'n' roll outfit the planet had ever seen. Inspired by Ry Cooder's work with Frank Zappa associate, Captain Beef hart, Peter switched to slide guitar and set about forging a brutal, slashing style. This move created a vacancy in his monster band vision for a bass player and Ian Rilan was drafted. A tiny howler of a vocalist from Melbourne by the name of Angry Anderson who had fronted the notorious Buster Brown - which featured later AC/DC drummer, Phil Rudd and bass player Geordie Leach who would end up on Tattoo's rank - and a young guitarist, Mick Cook's were looking for just the sort of band Peter was working on. On one of Angry's recruiting trips to Sydney he and Mick got together with Peter and Ian and blasted out in a basement in Petersham and Rose Tattoo was born. The band were round off with another Melbourne dweller, Dallas "Digger" Royal on drums.
On New Years Eve 1976, Rose Tattoo first official show was at Sydney's Bondi Lifesaver and it wasn't just the volume and aggression that drew attention. Legend has it that Angus Young and Bon Scott from AC/DC regularly joined the band on stage to do Chuck Berry and The Kinks numbers (a lot differently mind you). One night they dragged brother George and partner Harry down to see this unsigned act. George & Harry was mightily impressed and virtually signed them up on the spot. The rest is history.
In 1979, Rose Tattoo's first single with Alberts was Bad Boy For Love, produced by Harrry Vanda and George Young. Ian Rilen wrote the song and left the band after the release of the single which much to everyones surprise was a hit.
On 11th November 1980, the first album "Rose Tattoo" was produced by Vanda and Young, providing a quite awesome statement of intent. The band also contributed two live tracks, "Bad Boy For Love" and "Rock n' Roll Outlaw" from Canned Rock compilation. Geordie Leach had been recruited to consolidate the lineup with Angry Anderson. The album re-issued with eight bonus tracks, six of which are previously unreleased on 20 September 1990. (Taken from aussiebands.com)
The Bondi Lifesaver: A Sydney legend and institution. At least for those who frequented this part of the world. I think every major Australian band of the era must have played there, and it was an industry type hang out through the seventies. It closed sometime in 1980, so these gigs must have been very near the end. Interesting to note on this poster that they didn't know how to write INXS.
Rose Tattoo played many times at the Bondi Lifesaver, and one of their gigs was reported on by Anthony Grady in the March edition of RAM Magazine #53 in 1977. It would seem that Supernaut were billed on the same evening, but it is unsure which band was the main act and which band was supporting.
.
Rose Tattoo are about the ugliest band in Australia right now. Deliberately so. From their carefully grafted (rose-coloured) tattoos to t-shirts that have been constructed to look ripped and tat­tered, to singer Angry's punkoid stance and bald headed aggression they are anti-clean image through and through. Their music is basic boogie and could be as boring as any other basic boogie band currently doing the 12-bar shuffle around the clubs of Oz. But Rose Tattoo play their stuff with heightened aggression - As if every 12-bar is a fresh statement and not the cliche it really is. It's full-on electronic distortion topped off with screaming vocals and if you wanna protect yourself, you should stand at least 100 feet from the speakers. If you wanna blow yer brains though, stand right up on stage. Most of the fans do, and the band themselves like the sound louder'on stage than it is in the hall. Rose Tattoo are Peter Wells (guitar) Angry Anderson (vocals) lan Rilans (bass) Stork Van (!?) (drums) and Michael Cocks (guitar). There are three "name" players in the ensemble. Past form had Wells with Buffalo, Angry with Buster Brown and Rilans with Band of Light. At the moment, the song that has the edge over the rest of their repertoire is a non-original "Street Fightin' Man". But if Rose Tattoo can break their long in­stilled 12-bar habit and come up with a faster musical (?!) form that better suits their live (here comes that word again) aggression. They'll be out of the clubs and onto the concert circuit faster than you can say boooooooooogie. And that's a prediction.
.
Supernaut on the other hand offered splendid music varia
tion but minimal vibe. Their two singles "I Like It Both Ways" and "Too Hot To Touch" actually give a misleading impression of what the band has to offer. They're into song construction with spacey effects and their lyrics are wry and dry humoured with more than a little melodic inventiveness, The trouble with their stage act at the moment is. they could almost play the record through the PA and leave themselves at home. Musically they're absolutely honest to what they've put down on album and that may be a feature that needs re-thin king. Simply because the album has a nice sort of flow that is often subdued and approaching the laidback. But the punters at live gigs expect some­thing more, arrrgghh, raunchy. From the tepid applause, the boys at the Lifesaver did anyway. After Supernaut had finished there was another floor show, It ended with a bottle smashing into one fighter's face and the flow of blood reminded me most uncom­fortably of seeing someone else get booted to a pulp in London just before Xmas. (see last ish for details — sub ed). Maybe I just keep running into bloodbaths. Maybe it's just the way rock V roll is starling to gel these days. There are no conclusions yet. just an encroaching feel of dread. But at the moment I'm having trouble denying the links between an ag­gressive performance of say, Street Fighting Man, and real live street soldiers putting the boot in. [gig review by Anthony O'Grady, RAM #53, March 1977)
.
This rip provided here was taken from a Live-to-Air broadcast of their 1980 Bondi Lifesaver Gig, produced by Double J - I apologise for the low bitrate (128kps) but the quality of the recording is still excellent. Album artwork is included (thanks to Graham Farrell) and to Visual Lightbox for the B&W photo directly above.
.
Track Listing
01 One Of The Boys
02. Astra Wally
03. Tramp
04. Movin' On
05. Remedy
06. The Butcher & Fast Eddy
07. Nice Boys (Don't Play Rock 'n' Roll)
08. She's Gone
09. Snow Queen
10. Rock 'n' Roll Outlaw
11. Oxford St. Nick
12. Going Down
13. Sweet Love
14. Bad Boy For Love
.
Band Members
Angry Anderson (Vocals)
Pete Wells (Slide Guitar)
Mick Cocks (Guitar, Vocals)
Ian Rilen (Bass)
Dallas 'Digger' Royall (Drums)
.
Rose Tattoo Link (62Mb) REPOST
.

Sunday, September 13, 2009

V.A - Australian Idol (Major Idols)

(Australian Artists 2003-2006)
.
I would like to dedicate this post to the memory of my baby sister 'Sally Louisa Jane' who passed away on the 12th September, 2009 - aged 47. Although I didn't really get the opportunity to know her better, I do know she loved music and adored Australian Idol. So, as a tribute to her life, I have posted four of the best Idol Artist's and their live Idol highlights.
Anthony Callea's 'The Prayer' is my prayer for you Sally, Damien Leigh says 'You Are So Beautiful To Me', Guy Sebastian tells 'Angels Brought You Here' and Shannon Noll explains the hardship you had to bear in your life. May you now rest in peace, my dear Sister. I will never forget you.

.
Track Listing
Guy Sebastian - Angels Brought Me Here (Idol 2003)
Shannon Noll - What About Me (Idol 2003)
Anthony Callea - The Prayer (Idol 2004)
Damien Leith - You Are So Beautiful (Idol 2006)
.
Note: All tracks were recorded live from free-to-air T.V and therefore should not breach any copyright laws. If however, you believe this is not the case, then please leave a comment and I will remove the posting.
..
Australian Idol Link (13Mb) New Link 02/01/2017
.

Friday, September 11, 2009

Foghat - Selftitled (1972)

(UK 1968-Present)
.
Before forming Foghat, guitarist / vocalist "Lonesome" Dave Peverett, bassist Tony Stevens and drummer Roger Earl spent three years with the British Blues band Savoy Brown. In early 1971, the trio decided it was time to strike out on their own and recruited guitarist Rod Price to form a new group. As they began to stir interest in their hometown of London, England, Bearsville Records founder Albert Grossman brought the still-unnamed band into a recording studio to lay down some initial tracks with producer Todd Rundgren. Unfortunately, the pairing didn't pan out and the effort was scrapped, although some of the tracks that Rundgren recorded with the group were included on their debut album. Musician / producer Dave Edmunds ultimately headed up the band's first LP in 1972. On the eve of the album's completion, the band still hadn't decided on a name. Brandywine, Track and Hootch had been considered and rejected. Finally, Foghat, a nonsense word that Dave Peverett had made when playing scrabble as a child, was chosen. Foghat's self-titled debut LP reached #127 on the US album charts, with the single "I Just Want To Make Love To You" gaining them limited air play. The band quickly followed this up by recording and releasing "What A Shame", which got as far #82 on the Billboard Hot 100. Produced by Edmunds, "What A Shame" would later be included in remixed form on their second album, "Foghat" (aka "Rock & Roll"). The "Rock & Roll" LP was produced by Tom Dawes, following several disappointing sessions with Edmunds. Formerly with The Cyrkle (of "Red Rubber Ball" fame), Dawes brought a more mainstream touch to Foghat's studio approach. The album's cover, dreamed up by filmmaker Robert Downey, featured a photo of a rock and a roll in place of a title. It proved to be a visual pun that not everyone understood. Dawes was also hired to produce
................................(L-R Roger Earl, Rod Price, Tony Stephens, Lonesome Dave Peverett)
Foghat's 1974 album, "Energized", which included an R&B-flavored remake of Buddy Holly's "That'll Be The Day". Though "Energized" went on to reach gold status in the U.S., the band was never happy with its production. "Tom Dawes was really talented, but his musical tastes differed from ours," Peverett said "We wanted someone who understood the feeling of our music a little more." The band found such a producer in Nick Jameson, who had joined the Bearsville staff when Todd Rundgren worked with Nick's band American Dream. From there, Jameson became an engineer, remixing some tracks on the "Foghat" album. He returned to produce and engineer the group's "Rock And Roll Outlaws" LP, which produced the track "Dreamer" in 1974. At this point in their career, Foghat had a fairly spotty track record. The success of "Energized" was not matched by "Rock And Roll Outlaws", leaving the band with doubts about their future. Foghat continued to tour the US, mostly as an opening act. With four albums under their belts, they found themselves a mid-level band playing Rock / Blues to an audience that had moved away from such earthy sounds. Foghat's fortunes began to turn around with the 1975 LP "Fool For the City", which was their first album to go platinum and introduced them to US Top 40 radio with the #20 hit, "Slow Ride". Later that year, bassist Tony Stevens was replaced by Nick Jameson, who used his guitar skills to master bass after several weeks of intensive practice. The revamped Foghat had finally reached the big leagues, though not without some artistic sacrifices. "I think we started painting ourselves into a corner with "Fool For The City", Peverett would later say. "There was pressure to come up with another 'Slow Ride". After the '75 tour, Nick Jameson left the group to pursue a solo career, which later evolved into acting. He went on to well over 100 film credits, including The Critic, 24, Lost and was the voice of Palpatine in Star Wars: Clone Wars. He was replaced in 1976 by veteran bassist Craig MacGregor, whose hard-driving approach to playing bass reflected Foghat's increased emphasis on simple, aggressive Boogie-Rock numbers. "Slow Ride became a trademark song for us, and that was where the music headed," Peverett said. "The band's sound got bigger. We were playing larger venues and that sort of influenced our stuff. We wanted songs that would work in front of big audiences." The 1976 LP "Night Shift" spawned the #34 hit "Drivin' Wheel", as well as "I'll Be Standing", which stalled at #67. The album was produced by ex-Edgar Winter Group member Dan Hartman, who helped to steer Foghat even further in a commercial, airplay-oriented direction. The band's biggest commercial success came in the form of 1977's "Foghat Live", which sold over two million copies. The Nick Jameson effort captured the band at the height of their Boogie Monster phase. From the lofty intro to "Fool For The City" to an extended version of "Slow Ride", the album became the band's biggest seller. The live version of "I Just Want To Make Love To You" was released as a single and reached #33 on the Billboard chart. A 1972 studio version had only reached #83. "Foghat Live" went on to earn double platinum status. "I thought a live album would do well," says Peverett. "It pushed us even further. That was as big as we ever got." The band's next studio album, 1978's "Stone Blue" saw them paired with producer Eddie Cramer, who had previously engineered recordings for Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin. The Cramer / Foghat mix was a tension filled partnership that may have helped to give the album an added edge. The album's title track reached #36 in the US and a cover version of Robert Johnson's "Sweet Home Chicago" reasserted the band's Blues credentials. "Stone Blue" went Gold, as did the band's 1979 LP "Boogie Motel", which included their second highest charting single, "Third Time Lucky", which reached Billboard's #23 spot. The 1980 album "Tight Shoes", recorded in more of a Punk and New Wave style, featured a single called "Stranger In My Home Town", which could only manage to reach #81. Despite the band's earlier success, Rod Price had grown unhappy with the group's constant touring schedule and their shift towards a more New Wave influenced Pop direction. He left the band in November 1980, and after months of auditions, was replaced by guitarist Erik Cartwright in February 1981.
Cartwright came on board just in time to record on "Girls To Chat & Boys To Bounce", which was produced by Nick Jameson. Unfortunately, tracks like "Live Now - Pay Later", failed to win Foghat many new converts. Craig MacGregor quit the band in 1982 and Nick Jameson returned to play on "In the Mood For Something Rude", an album of mostly R&B covers that failed to impress anybody but the most die hard Foghat fans. The band's record sales had begun to slip and their last album for the Bearsville label, "Zig-Zag Walk" in 1983, could only manage a brief stay on the Billboard Hot 200 album chart and peaked at #192. Nick Jameson was replaced by Kenny Aaronson in 1983, but he was forced to leave after a brief stay for medical reasons. Aaronson was replaced by Rob Alter, former guitarist for the Ian Hunter Group, who also had to leave for medical reasons the following year. Alter was replaced by returning alumni Craig Macgregor who brought along multi instrumentalist Jason "Bakko" Bakken. Foghat continued to tour until early 1985, when Lonesome Dave retired to England after some 16 years on the road. The remaining members, Roger Earl, Erik Cartwright and Craig MacGregor took a brief break and along with Jim Robarge on organ and piano, reunited as The Kneetremblers. Billed as "formerly Foghat", The Kneetremblers played R&B until 1986 when Robarge left the group and was replaced by Eric "EJ" Burgeson on guitars. A few months later, The Kneetremblers, citing both fan pressure and Burgeson's knowledge of the material, began touring as Foghat. This band later became commonly known as "Roger Earl's Foghat." Roger Earl's Foghat went through a revolving door of players over the next few years. Craig MacGregor continued until the end of '86, when he departed for a solo career. He was replaced by Erik's brother Brett Cartwright, who stayed until 1989 and was subsequently replaced by Jeff Howell.

Also departing in 1989 was Eric "EJ" Burgeson, who left to join Craig MacGregor's band. Burgeson was replaced by Phil Nudelman who in turn left in 1990 and was replaced by Billy Davis. The final replacement being Dave Crigger, who replaced Jeff Howell on Bass in 1992. In 1990, Dave Peverett reactivated his own version of Foghat known as "Lonesome Dave's Foghat" with all new players including original Wild Cherry guitarist Brian Bassett, former Hall and Oates members, drummer Eddie Zyne and bassist Stephen Dees and later, bassist Riff West, who had played for Molly Hatchet for ten years. Lonesome Dave's Foghat also included some performances by Rod Price. The two versions of Foghat toured separately from 1990 until 1993, when the original Foghat was reformed after Tony Stevens and Rod Price rejoined and things were patched up between Dave Peverett and Roger Earl. Rod Price, Tony Stevens, Roger Earl and Lonesome Dave Peverett, the original founding band members, toured in support of their studio CD, "Return Of The Boogie Men" and a follow-up live CD "Road Cases" (with Bryan Basset replacing Rod Price in 1999) until Lonesome Dave's untimely death from cancer on February 7th, 2000. After some time spent mourning, the band soldiered on with a new line-up, adding Charlie Huhn on vocals and after two years of touring released "Family Joules" in 2002. Foghat toured for the next few years and issued "The Official Bootleg DVD, Volume 1" in 2004. Rod Price died on March 22, 2005 from a head injury sustained in a fall down a flight of stairs precipitated by a massive heart attack. Later that year, Tony Stevens was replaced again by Craig MacGregor. In 2006, a follow up to the best-selling "Live" album was released - "Live II" and in 2008, Foghat was still criss-crossing the United States with a full touring schedule.
(Extract from http://www.classicbands.com/ Photos from Lonesome Dave's Archives & Bob Savage - http://www.foghat.com/)
.
I picked up this album 2nd hand while browsing the record racks at a small outlet in Geelong (Australia) back in the early 70's. Knowing very little about the band Foghat at the time I was first drawn to the LP by its distinctive "Bearsville Record Label". Upon closer inspection, I noted the inclusion of the Chuck Berry classic 'Maybellene', so this was good enough for me to part with my hard earn't cash. Of course, when I heard Foghat's legendary rock classic 'I Just Want To Make Love To You' come thumping out of my Onkyo stereo speakers for the first time, I was totally blown away! Every track on this album is a winner, 'Sarah Lee' been a particular favourite of mine. I gotta say, this album has been played at more parties than I can remember and still remains as one of my prize possessions. Best $2.99 I ever spent !
This Rip was taken from CD at 320kps and includes full album artwork plus band photos.
.
Track Listing
01 - I Just Want To Make Love To You
02 - Trouble, Trouble
03 - Leavin' Again (Again!)
04 - Fool's Hall Of Fame
05 - Sarah Lee
06 - Highway (Killing Me)
07 - Maybellene
08 - A Hole To Hide In
09 - Gotta Get To Know You
.
Band Members
'Lonesome Dave' Peverett (Guitars, Vocals)
Rod Price (Guitar)
Tony Stevens (Bass)
Roger Earl (Drums)
.
Foghat Link (69Mb) Link Fixed 22/12/2012
.

Monday, September 7, 2009

Eire Apparent - Sunrise (1969) + Bonus Track

(U.K / Irish 1967-1970)
.
Eire Apparent were a band that deserved more success than they enjoyed in their brief three-year existence, and more recognition than they've received in the decades since.
Mostly they're remembered for having had one album produced by Jimi Hendrix. The band had its roots in the Irish show band scene of the mid-'60s -- guitarist Henry McCullough had put his time in, playing with outfits such as the Sky Rockets and Gene & the Gents, based on Portstewart, Northern Ireland. By 1967, McCullough had decided to take his talent and career elsewhere and headed to Belfast and then to England, to Blackpool, where he crossed paths with Chris Stewart (bass), Ernie Graham (guitar/vocals), and Dave Lutton (drums). The latter were all ex-members of a show band called Tony & the Telstars, and with McCullough decided to form a psychedelic band that they christened the People. They made their way to London, where they struggled just to earn a decent living -- but a fortuitous gig at the UFO Club brought them to the attention of Mike Jeffery and Chas Chandler, the two managers of Jimi Hendrix. They got the band -- renamed Eire Apparent at Jeffery's insistence -- signed to Track Records, the imprint belonging to Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp (for which Hendrix also recorded), who were also the managers of the Who.For musicians who had been living in dire poverty when they arrived in London, the whirlwind of VIP representation they'd stepped into and the opportunities suddenly presenting themselves were astonishing. And it only got better when Eire Apparent were booked onto Hendrix's next tour of the British isles, working alongside acts such as the Move and such up-and-coming bands as Pink Floyd and the Nice. The finish to 1967 was capped by the recording of their first single, "Follow Me" b/w "Here I Go Again," which was issued in January of 1968. The record never charted, however, and marked their last release on Track.
.
Next it was off to America, supporting Hendrix, Eric Burdon & the Animals, and Soft Machine (both acts managed by Jeffery). They spent a large part of 1968 playing shows in the United States, and had one show scheduled in Canada. At that point, the group's fortunes suffered a setback when McCullough was arrested, in part due to problems with his visa, and deported to
Ireland. It marked his exit from the band, as he was summarily replaced by Mick Cox, who completed the tour with the group and became a permanent member.
The following month, the reconfigured Eire Apparent resumed their run at stardom with an album. What made the record special, beyond what the four members brought to the table, was the presence of Jimi Hendrix as producer. Hendrix had previously served in a similar capacity on behalf of Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys, but Eire Apparent attracted somewhat more attention, owing to the fact that their album received an American release through the Buddah label, which also issued their second single, "Rock 'n' Roll Band" b/w "Yes I Need Someone."
Note: Rock 'n' Roll Band was not released on their debut album 'Sunrise' but was later added to the later CD re-release of this album.
.
Hendrix also played on both sides of the single, as well as on the Chris Stewart-authored album track "The Clown," but his involvement with their music was more complex than even these moments of direct participation. The guitarist apparently saw Eire Apparent as a vehicle for more pop-oriented sounds than he usually got to explore on his own recordings, freely mixing softer sounds with a strong psychedelic influence amid the harder sound that was the group's forte. The harder sounds of songs such as "Morning Glory" were juxtaposed with more lyrical moments, vocally and instrumentally, without ever losing sight of their basic heavy electric sound. The results -- to which Robert Wyatt (Soft Machine) and Noel Redding also apparently contributed -- were off-putting to some who expected something different from a project related to Jimi Hendrix, and also may have arrived a little late for the psychedelic influences.
The album, entitled Sunrise, was issued on the Buddah label in the United States, and thanks to Hendrix's name on it and the time they put in touring, it did sell better than some Buddah releases of the era that didn't have a hit single to drive sales or get AM radio play. Copies of the record turned up in collections and used bins from time to time from the 1970s through the 1990s (and, indeed, still sometimes show up), which is more than can be said for some Buddah LPs of the era. But sales were nowhere near what was needed to break the group properly in the U.S. (and thanks to the U.S.-only release, Sunrise became a true rarity in England). Additionally, Eire Apparent had run into serious trouble on two fronts. Their extended time touring America
.
had left them without an audience in England, and the gigs there dried up when the band members were left to their own devices (and not touring with Hendrix). Additionally, they parted company with Jeffery after a tour of Europe opening for Hendrix. Without him, Burdon, or Soft Machine to headline, however, and without a hit record, their prospects in America were now dimmed considerably. Most of '69 was spent slogging round the English clubs and universities, trying to re-establish themselves in a country that had largely forgotten them. It was to prove to be an uphill task. At least one personnel change took place, Mike Cox left (eventually forming his own band) and was replaced by Tiger Taylor who took over guitar. It's also rumoured that Pete Tolson (aka Pretty Things) also passed through the band. In May '69, Beat Instrumental reported that they were recording tracks for a new album, but nothing has ever surfaced. The only 'recordings' known from this era are the three tracks done for a Top Gear session (20/4/69), 'Yes I Need Someone', 'Highway 61' and the popular 'Gloria'. (If anyone passing, has seen these tracks, please leave a comment as I have yet to find them and would dearly love to hear them).
The band survived until the end of the year and finally gave up. In later years, Eire Apparent were mostly remembered as a footnote to Hendrix's career, though the members remained active throughout the ensuing decade and beyond. Eire Apparent were not the greatest band of the 60's, but they certainly were an excellent one and will always be remembered for their contributions to the glorious era of psychedelic music and their association with the legendary 'Jimi Hendrix'
.
Ernie Graham went on to cut an excellent solo album for United Artists, joined Help Yourself and during the pub-rock days fronted Clancy. The others kept a lower profile, Mick Cox organized a band of his own and worked with Van Morrison, among others, while Dave Lutton passed through the lineup of Heavy Jelly, before crossing paths professionally with Marc Bolan and Chris Spedding. Chris Stewart went on to become a top session man, while Henry McCullough, following his sudden exit from the band, jumped to Spooky Tooth and then the Grease Band. He backed Joe Cocker on the With a Little Help From My Friends album, and did a lot of session work (including Donovan's Essence to Essence). He was also a member of Paul McCartney's Wings in one of its early configurations, on the Red Rose Speedway album.

Further information and photos about Eire Apparent can be found at Irishrock, the source of all photos reproduced in this post. The rip here was taken from the remastered CD at 320kps and contains full album artwork. I have also included the bonus track "Here I Go Again", which I sourced from a compilation album called 'We Can Fly: Psych Rarities Vol 4'. This bonus track is a wonderful fuzzed out, acid track that was released as a B-Side single in 1968 (but could have easily been an A-Side single in my opinion).
.
Track Listing
01. Yes, I Need Someone
02. Got to Get Away
03. The Clown
04. Mr. Guy Fawkes
05. Someone Is Sure To (Want You)
06. Rock & Roll Band [*]
07. Morning Glory
08. Magic Carpet
09. Captive in the Sun
10. Let Me Stay
11. 1026
12. Here I Go Again (Bonus B-Single)

[* ] Only available on CD remaster
.
Band Members:
Chris Stewart: Bass
Ernie Graham: Vocals/Guitar
Mick Cox: Guitars
Dave Lutton: Drums
.
Eire Apparent Link (117Mb) REPOSTED 06/11/2012
.

Sunday, September 6, 2009

Dear Enemy - Ransom Note (1983) + Bonus Tracks

(Australian 1982-88)
.
Taking their name from a reference to the Ginger Meggs comic strip, Melbourne band Dear Enemy formed ranks in 1982. Their original lineup comprised vocalist Ron Martini, guitarists Chris Langford and Les Barker, keyboardist Martin Fisher (ex-Little Heroes), bassist Peter Leslie (ex-Little Heroes) and drummer Ian Morrison. Prior to taking the name Dear Enemy, they had played together as a covers band called Stonewall.The band picked up a strong following on the live circuit and in 1983 signed a recording contract with the American label EMI/Capitol - a rare feat for any Australian act. They recorded their debut album ‘Ransom Note’ in the U.S. under the guidance of producer Peter McIan who had produced Men At Work and Mondo Rock. The impressive album generated
.
three quality singles, the first of which "Computer One" (which was written in America by Langford and Fisher) proved to be Dear Enemy’s one and only major hit, peaking at #5 on the Australian charts in late 1983. The follow up single "The Good Life" stalled at #39 a few months later, whilst the slide continued with the third single "Kids On The Street" failing to chart. Ransom Note sold more than 25,000 units and reached #15 on the national album charts.
Dear Enemy released a new single a few months later with "New Hero", which featured on the soundtrack to the Australian motion picture Street Hero. The single however only reached #93 on the
.
charts. A couple of lineup changes, with Joey Amenta replacing Barker in April, 1985, and two more flop singles, "Stay" and "You're Right, You're Right", followed over the next four years before Dear Enemy’s system crashed and they called it a day at the end of 1988. Dear Enemy did record tracks for a second album during this period but due to contract and legal problems the album didn’t see the light of day, until a Greatest Hits CD was released in 2000 called "Ransom Note & Beyond" which showcases some of these unreleased tracks (Extract from Wikipedia).
Although I enjoy their cliche' single 'Computer One', I actually think their follow up single 'The Good Life' is a better track both musically and lyrically.
This rip was taken from CD at 256kps and contains full album Artwork.
.
Track Listing
01 - Computer One
02 - The Good Life
03 - Talkin' To You
04 - All Through The Night
05 - Kids On The Street
06 - On The Line
07 - Restless
08 - Bit Of Your Heart
09 - Day To Day
[Bonus Tracks]
10 - New Hero
11 - You're Right You're Right
12 - It Was You I Was Looking For
13 - Hold On
14 - Kids On The Street
15 - Wild Child

16 - Love Flows
17 - Looking For Your Love
18 - In The Heat Of The Night
.
Band Members
Ron Martini (Lead Vocals)
Les Barker (Guitar, Vocals)
Martin Fischer (Keyboards, Vocals)
Chris Langford (Guitar, Vocals)
Peter Leslie (Bass, Vocals)
Ian Morrison (Drums)
.
Dear Enemy Link (163Mb) New Link  02/08/2015
.

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Cold Chisel - Selftitled (1978) + Bonus Demos

(Australian 1973-84)
.
In 1973, a band called Orange was almost complete and needed a full-time lead singer. The band approached a man by the name of John Swan to fill the role, but he declined and suggested his younger brother of 16 years, Jimmy Barnes, be given an chance. Jimmy ended up joining the band which had by 1974 renamed itself Cold Chisel, and consisted of himself (lead vocals, guitar), Ian Moss (lead vocals, lead guitar), Don Walker (keyboards), Steve Prestwich (drums) and Phil Small (bass guitar). All band members were also songwriters, the most proficient being Don Walker. The band spent the next 4 years working the Australian pub circuit and trying to get a recording contract. After being given a hard time by the record companies, WEA finally gave them a chance after hearing a four song demo tape (that another record company rejected!) with a mystery song that never appeared on any Cold Chisel album, sung by Ian Moss...when a friend asked Don Walker about he barely remembered it..but confirmed the name..Also this is an entirely different version of four walls...different story..same melody but much heavier.....they are very raw. These demos are included as bonus tracks in this post.
.
.
"What happened after this was that Cold Chisel produced one of the finest Oz rock albums of all time. It showcases the writing of Don Walker, who has a fine musical and lyrical sense, the wood-rasp voice of Jimmy Barnes and some fine flashes of guitar work from Ian Moss, perhaps one of the most expressive and hard-working guitarists currently playing in Oz." (Extract from 'Juke' magazine, June 1978).
By the time Aussie rockers Cold Chisel did their sold-out farewell shows at the Sydney Entertainment Centre in December of 1983, they had established themselves as one of the all-time legendary bands down under. But it was their debut album that lit the fuse in the days when the crowds were eager but thin. After migrating from their home town of Adelaide, South Australia, to the big smoke of Sydney in 1977, the Chisels gained a rep for slugging it out on the pub circuit with an ardor worthy of their illustrious forebears ACDC. But as Cold Chisel clearly illustrates, Chisel was a band married as much to melody as power. Pianist Don Walker's songwriting reflects an emotional depth and range rarely rivaled by other max-volume outfits.
.
The Vietnam-vet song "Khe Sanh" became one of Aussie rock's most enduring anthems with its punchy piano line and everyman pathos. But full-throttle rockers like "Juliet," "Home and Broken Hearted," and "Daskarzine" — with Ian Moss' Page/Hendrix-tinted guitar histrionics blitzing away — packed all the clout pub fans could want. At the other end of the spectrum, gin-soaked ballads like "Rosaline" and "Just How Many Times" reveal the band's predilection for the occasional jazz/blues-inflected number. The lyrical imagery, the mix of musical finesse and freneticism, and Barnes' razor-wire vocals all came together in perfect synergy on this stunning debut album. At once polished and raw, this is a classic. (Extract Adrian Zupp, allmusic.com)
The well established Australian blues rock outfit, Cold Chisel got off to a good start with this debut album, over thirty years ago. Cold chisel played some great jazz blues rock. Although they were not well known outside the Australasian region, the band's musicianship and songwriting was of a very high standard, and deserved a bigger audience.

The rip included here was taken from CD at 320kbs, including the four demo tracks (thanks to Skids at Ausrock for the demos) and comes with full album artwork. My favourite tracks are "One Long Day" and "Khe Sanh" but the whole album is a true classic - enjoy.
.
Track Listing
01 - Juliet
02 - Khe Sanh
03 - Home And Broken Hearted
04 - One Long Day
05 - Northbound
06 - Rosaline
07 - Daskarzine
08 - Just How Many Times
[Bonus Tracks]
09 - Bunny's Blues (Demo)
10 - Rosaline (Demo)
11 - Home And Broken Hearted (Demo)
12 - Four Walls (Demo)
.
Band Members:
Jimmy Barnes (vocals)
Ian Moss (Guitar, vocals)
Don Walker (Piano, Organ)
Phil Small (Bass)
Steve Prestwich (Drums)
.
Additional Musicians
Dave Blight (harmonica, track 2)
Peter Walker (acoustic guitar, track 2)
Wilbur Wilde (saxophone, tracks 3, 6 and 8)
Joe Camilleri (saxophone)
Janice Slater (backing vocals)
Carol Stubbley (backing vocals)


Sorry, but as of 22-07-2011 this album is now available again, along with reissues of the whole Cold Chisel catalog from the following distributor (Please support the artist)

However, I am still able to make available the "four bonus demos" for you
.
.